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Police release audio of suspect in Indiana girls' deaths

Police release audio of suspect in Indiana girls' deathsDELPHI, Ind. (AP) — A teenage girl turned her cellphone on and recorded a man saying "down the hill" before she and a friend were killed along a northern Indiana hiking trail last week, authorities said Wednesday.


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College Board tightens SAT exam security, but key risk remains

The New York-based College Board said the steps include reducing the number of times the test is given outside the United States and increasing the auditing of test centers. As Reuters reported last year, the College Board has failed to stop a widespr...

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March of National Dignity in Kiev

March of National Dignity in KievThousands of activists have marched in Kiev to honor protesters who were killed during the pro-European Maidan demonstrations in 2013-14 and to challenge the government. The March of National Dignity was organized by three nationalist parties — Svoboda (Freedom), the National Corps and Right Sector. Activists gathered on Kiev’s central Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) early on February 22 and began marching toward Parliament, where they planned to announce their demands to lawmakers, the cabinet, and President Petro Poroshenko.


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Texas to feral pigs: It's time for the 'hog apocalypse' to begin

Texas to feral pigs: It's time for the 'hog apocalypse' to beginTexas has a new plan for its 2.5 million feral hogs: total annihilation.  Sid Miller, the state's agriculture commissioner, just approved a pesticide — called "Kaput Feral Hog Lure" — for statewide use. "The 'hog apocalypse' may finally be on the horizon," Miller said in a statement on Tuesday. SEE ALSO: First human-pig chimeras created, sparking hopes for transplantable organs — and debate "This solution is long overdue," he added. "Wild hogs have caused extensive damage to Texas lands and loss of income for many, many years." Texas's agriculture commission estimates that feral hogs cause $52 million in damage each year to agricultural businesses by tearing up crops and pastures, knocking down fences and ruining equipment. The so-called hog lure is derived from warfarin, a blood-thinning agent that's also used to kill rats and mice in homes and buildings. Animals don't die immediately from eating the odorless, tasteless chemical. That would be too kind. Instead, they keep eating it until the anti-clotting properties cause them to bleed to death internally. This week, Miller approved a rule change in the Texas Administrative Code that allows landowners and agricultural producers to use Kaput — essentially warfarin-laced pellets — to keep feral hogs off their property.  Not on my watch, hogs. Image: mark thompson/Getty Images Proponents of the hog toxicant, including the Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service, say it's an effective tool because it's only strong enough to kill the swine, and not other wildlife populations or livestock. In January, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency registered Kaput's hog bait under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, a move that made the product available for general use. Still, environmentalists and hog hunters alike staunchly oppose using warfarin to stamp out Texas's feral pig problem. Pigs poop, after all, and other animals could ingest the warfarin along the way. Some Texans hunt the pigs for sport and food, and they're worried about eating poisoned swine. "For Texas to introduce a poison into the equation is a bad decision in our opinion and could likely contaminate humans who unknowingly process and eat feral hogs," the Texas Hog Hunters Association said in a Change.org petition to block the rule change. MIke and his big ole boar from yesterday. Lamar county Texas https://t.co/jQoS5JbtnQ pic.twitter.com/2SeAKs7zbh — TX Hog Hunters Assn. (@texashoghunters) February 14, 2017 Louisiana might become the next state to use Kaput to quell its feral hog population, which worries state wildlife veterinarian Jim LaCour. He said local black bears and raccoons could easily lift the lid to the cages containing the warfarin-laced pellets. "We do have very serious concerns about non-target species," LaCour told the Times-Picayune in New Orleans.  "When the hogs eat, they're going to drop crumbs on the outside, where small rodents can get them and not only intoxicate themselves but also birds of prey that eat them. Since the poison will be on the landscape for weeks on end, the chances of these birds eating multiple affected animals is pretty good," he told the newspaper. The pesticide's manufacturer, Scimetrics Ltd. Corp., assures the pesticide is safe for humans and wildlife — just not for feral pigs. 


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S. Africa budget throws light on fractured ANC

South Africa's Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan delivers the annual budget in parliament Wednesday as he battles to revive the economy and head off loyalists of the president who seek to oust him. Gordhan, a popular figure in South Africa and among int...

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Malaysia names North Korean diplomat wanted for questioning in murder case

By Rozanna Latiff KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Malaysian police on Wednesday named a North Korean diplomat along with a state airline official who are wanted for questioning over the murder of Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korea's lead...

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Top US envoys to meet Mexico president to calm tension

The US secretaries of state and homeland security meet with Mexico's president on Thursday, seeking to ease diplomatic tensions over President Donald Trump's trade and immigration policies. With the countries' relations at their most strained in years...

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Immigration advocates denounce DHS plan to implement Trump executive orders

Immigration advocates denounce DHS plan to implement Trump executive ordersImmigration policy experts lashed out Tuesday at the Department of Homeland Security’s plan to implement President Trump’s executive orders on immigration. “In my many years of practicing immigration law, I have not seen a mass deportation blueprint like this one,” Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that advocates for the rights of low-income immigrant families, said in a conference call with reporters. In two memos issued Tuesday, DHS Secretary John Kelly laid out sweeping new guidance for officers tasked with carrying out the president’s immigration policies.


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