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Clinton tries to break through Trump surge with GOP attacks

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to supporters during a campaign rally at La Rumba, a Denver dance club and restaurant, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)WASHINGTON (AP) — Ten Republican candidates for president in 2016 will debate Thursday for first time. Spend any time listening to Democratic frontrunner Hillary Rodham Clinton this past week, though, and it would seem like only one really matters: Jeb Bush.


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Heavily Hispanic Florida city rejects anti-Trump resolution

MIAMI (AP) — A resolution to condemn Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's remarks about Mexican immigrants failed Wednesday night to win approval of the city council in Doral, a city dominated by Hispanic immigrants and home to one of the billionaire businessman's biggest resorts.

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Senator ‘alarmed’ by reports U.S. military families harassed

A U.S. Senator said on Wednesday he was alarmed by reports of an FBI alert that relatives of U.S. military personnel in Colorado and Wyoming were harassed outside their homes by Middle Eastern men who may have had them under surveillance. "I am alarmed...

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The very busy Day One of Republican White House hopefuls

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker speaks at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference at National Harbor, Maryland, February 26, 2015The Iran deal, emission regulations and immigration orders frame Barack Obama's legacy -- and they would all be toast on day one of a Republican presidency, vow conservative White House candidates. Taken together, the Republican message seems to be: On inauguration day January 20, 2017, hundreds of key orders or accomplishments by the current president will be repealed. Property tycoon Donald Trump, who currently leads the Republican field, said he would "immediately" rescind Obama's executive orders on immigration and build a "great wall" to stem illegal flows of Mexicans into the United States.


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Federal court strikes down ‘discriminatory’ Texas voter ID

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal appeals court struck down Texas' voter ID law on Wednesday in a victory for the Obama administration, which had taken the unusual step of bringing the weight of the U.S. Justice Department to fight new Republican-backed mandates at the ballot box.

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Sharply divided SEC adopts controversial CEO pay ratio rule

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gallagher speaks at the Sandler O'Neill + Partners, L.P. Global Exchange and Brokerage Conference in New YorkBy Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A sharply divided U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission adopted new rules on Wednesday that will require certain companies to publish a ratio of how their chief executives' pay squares with the median pay of their workers. Both Republican commissioners voted against the rule, saying it is nothing more than a politically charged rule that will do nothing for investors. The SEC's two Democrats praised the measure, saying it will provide valuable information to the marketplace. SEC Chair Mary Jo White, an independent, cast the tie-breaking vote. ...


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3 Questions on Jeb Bush’s ‘Women’s Health’ Gaffe

3 Questions on Jeb Bush's ‘Women's Health’ GaffeJeb Bush offered a study in how not to talk about reproductive health on Tuesday. Attack Planned Parenthood? Smart politics for a Republican. Tell an audience, “I’m not sure we need half a billion dollars for women’s health issues”? Not such a great idea. Unsurprisingly, Bush now says he misspoke, but his remarks raise several interesting questions.


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3 Questions on Jeb Bush’s ‘Women’s Health’ Gaffe

Jeb Bush offered a study in how not to talk about reproductive health on Tuesday. Attack Planned Parenthood? Smart politics for a Republican. Tell an audience, “I’m not sure we need half a billion dollars for women’s health issues”? Not such a great idea.

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Republicans see Trump as positive debate influence: Reuters poll

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures at a news conference near the U.S.- Mexico border outside of Laredo, TexasBy John Whitesides WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Most Republicans believe real estate mogul Donald Trump will positively influence Thursday's first presidential debate, saying his presence will challenge the establishment and open the party to new ideas, a Reuters/Ipsos poll shows. Trump's outspokenness has worried party leaders and heightened anticipation for a potentially combative debate, which will be televised live at 9 p.m. EDT on Fox News, which invited 10 of the 17 Republican contenders to participate. Trump, whose rapid rise to the top of the 2016 Republican pack in polls will put him center stage in Thursday's debate in Cleveland, has courted controversy with personal attacks on his rivals and scathing comments about Senator John McCain's war record and about Mexican immigrants.


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California governor challenges GOP candidates on climate change

The letter, sent a day ahead of the Republican primary debate in Cleveland, attributed California's raging wildfires and years-long drought to global warming caused by human activity, a theory generally rejected by the Republican Party. Brown recently ...

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