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2016 prospect Rand Paul in new book: GOP willing to change

FILE - In this April 7, 2015 file photo, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. holds up his cell phone as he speaks before announcing the start of his presidential campaign, in Louisville, Ky. The Justice Department warned lawmakers that the National Security Agency (NSA) will have to wind down its bulk collection of Americans' phone records by the end of the week if Congress fails to reauthorize the Patriot Act. The Republican divisions over the issue was on stark display in the Senate on Wednesday as Paul, a candidate for president, stood on the floor and spoke at length about his opposition to NSA spying. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul reaches out in his most direct way yet to African-Americans in a new book that highlights his libertarian policies on government surveillance, the economy and criminal justice reform.


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Paid late, some ex-staffers of White House hopeful Fiorina won’t sign on again

Former Hewlett-Packard Co Chief Executive and Republican U.S. presidential candidate Carly Fiorina speaks during the Freedom Summit in GreenvilleFiorina, once one of America's most powerful businesswomen, is now campaigning for the Republican nomination in 2016. The reason: for more than four years, Fiorina - who has an estimated net worth of up to $120 million - didn’t pay them, a review of Federal Election Commission records shows. On the campaign trail, the former Hewlett-Packard CEO has portrayed herself as a battle-hardened business leader who possesses the best financial skills among fellow Republican presidential hopefuls.


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U.S. senators try to block extension of bulk data collection

U.S. Presidential candidate and Texas Senator Rand Paul speaks at the Republican Party of Iowa's Lincoln Dinner in Des MoinesBy Patricia Zengerle and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican Rand Paul interrupted debate in the U.S. Senate on Wednesday to make a speech opposing legislation that would extend U.S. spy agencies' collection of Americans' telephone data. As the hours passed, he was joined by other legislators, including Democrat Ron Wyden, who also want to convince the Senate not to extend provisions of the USA Patriot Act that provide the legal basis for the collection of billions of telephone call records. "We shouldn't be so fearful that we're willing to relinquish our rights without a spirited debate," Paul said.


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Rand Paul leads charge against data collection

U.S. Presidential candidate and Texas Senator Rand Paul speaks at the Republican Party of Iowa's Lincoln Dinner in Des MoinesBy Patricia Zengerle and Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican Rand Paul interrupted debate in the U.S. Senate on Wednesday to make a speech opposing legislation that would extend U.S. spy agencies' collection of Americans' telephone data. As the hours passed, he was joined by other legislators, including Democrat Ron Wyden, who also want to convince the Senate not to extend provisions of the USA Patriot Act that provide the legal basis for the collection of billions of telephone call records. "We shouldn't be so fearful that we're willing to relinquish our rights without a spirited debate," Paul said.


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Paul commandeers Senate to protest Patriot Act

In this image from Senate video, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and a Republican presidential contender, speaks on the floor of the U.S. Senate Wednesday afternoon, May 20, 2015, at the Capitol in Washington, during a long speech opposing renewal of the Patriot Act. Paul claimed he was filibustering, but under the Senate rules, he wasn’t. (Senate TV via AP)WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul commandeered the Senate floor Wednesday to deliver a nearly 11 hours-long protest against renewal of the Patriot Act, calling the post-Sept. 11 law government intrusion on Americans' privacy.


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Jeb Bush says climate is changing but human role is ‘convoluted’

Reporters use their mobile phones to record potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush as he answers questions in PortsmouthBy Steve Holland BEDFORD, N.H. (Reuters) - Republican Jeb Bush said on Wednesday that the Earth's climate is changing but that scientific research does not clearly show how much of the change is due to humans and how much is from natural causes. Bush delved into climate politics during a campaign-style house party in New Hampshire at which he took questions from voters on his viewpoints as he considers whether to seek the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. While President Barack Obama and many scientists believe humans are largely to blame for climate change, Bush said the degree of human responsibility is uncertain.


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First Republican debate in August will not be open to all

By Peter Cooney WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The first debate among Republicans seeking their party's 2016 presidential nomination is scheduled for Aug. 6 in Cleveland, but not all the hopefuls will get a chance to bask in the national television spotlight. ...

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Oklahoma GOP roiled by infighting as conference looms

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — As Republicans prepare for some of the party's biggest names to descend on Oklahoma for the Southern Republican Leadership Conference, the state party is being rocked by infighting over its new chairman's decision to retain a staffer who pleaded guilty to a domestic violence charge.

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Paul commandeers Senate to protest Patriot Act

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul commandeered the Senate floor Wednesday to deliver an hours-long protest against renewal of the Patriot Act, calling the post-Sept. 11 law government intrusion ...

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